Despite the cases I have mentioned, there are circumstances in which written agreements can be effective. We know, for example, that they can work well if family members participate fully and equally in their development, for example. B through family group conferences. Here parents are able and able to develop the right plan and agreement for them. This is a far cry from the situations I mentioned above. What`s most troubling is that some people have made very lucrative “careers” (I use parentheses to emphasize the fact that I think such careers shouldn`t exist, because they border on abuse in their own right) to promote this tit-for-tat adverse nonsense. In fact, it`s often about doing things to a child that society wouldn`t expect a child to experience. Does any of us really think that children experience sexual acts with adults in general, that they use drugs and alcohol well before puberty, that they should be thrown down the stairs, locked in coal holes or feed on garbage bags. ? So if a child or teenager says this kind of thing happened to them, why would they make it up? After all, these experiences are not the usual and expected domain of the experience a child or adolescent might have – where would the child or adolescent know about these experiences to report them as abuse? I do NOT really believe that young children have a thorough knowledge of sexual acts that constitute abuse, emotional and verbal abuse, physical abuse, etc., unless they have experienced them first-hand or experienced them otherwise. . . .